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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
." >> not reaching out aggressively enough like bill clinton, lbj, ronald reagan did. and also it was critical the first four years about him not reaching out enough to the business community. he didn't understand the business community, according to ceos who supported him for four years. but steve rattner, he's made a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up,
the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting the links. this is a photo from last year. what we don't know what was said teen them this year my guest homes the former president was critiquing more than just his successor's swing. art laffer was the top reagan economic adviser and you voted twice for bill clinton because his prosecutor mix of taxes. explain that? >>guest: yes i sure did. but for the raise hikes at top end, he cut taxes on the working people between ages of 65 and 72. he cut taxes on trade and products. he cut government spending as a share g.d.p. dramatically and he cut the capital gains tax rate and butt in welfare reform. what do you want from a president that bill clinton did not deliver? he was a great president. >>neil: the investment taxes was that concurrent with what was going on in the income tax hike front? >>guest: no. it was not. the capital gains tax reduction which he dropped the high of the race from 28 percent to 20 percent but what he really did that was amazing, he exempted owner occupied homes from ever paying capital gains taxes again, $250
your tax system is. and it's pretty low now. you know compare it to the clinton era rates, which is kind of all we're talking about, right? going back to the clinton era rate of 39% -- >> is it about fairness? or is it about lessening the deficit? because it doesn't really do a whole lot for the debt or deficit over ten years. >> well, it's about fairness, but it's also about what are the better options? given that the wealthy are really skating by these days. and so how do you collect more revenue from them? and all the various ideas about, well, you cap this deduction, and cap that deduction. there are not only political constituencies that will fight tooth and claw on every deducti deduction, there are some reasons, fairly good reasons why you would want to think twice. you know, are you going to go after home mortgage deduction at a time when the housing industry is trying to get its feet? are you going to go after the exemption on taxation for health insurance? i mean, that's the biggest one, actually. that's like $250 billion a year. but i don't think anybody wants to dive
an economic growth. first during the clinton administration, the top marginal tax rate was raised on the wealthiest individuals and the economy grew at its fastest rate in a generation. it added more than 22 million jobs. during the following eight years, the top marginal rate dax tax rate was lower, but economy never regained its strength from the reviews decade. middle-class families are vulnerable when the recession began at the end of 2007. i hope this hearing is helpful not just in this hearing, but across this country to people who are watching and waiting for congress to act. i will say more at the end about some of our members who are leaving. it is -- it has been an honor for me to serve as chairman of this committee and also served with my friend, kevin brady, as vice chair. he has been great to work with. i hope there'll be bipartisan success in congress. i look forward to working with him as i change seats in the senate for the next congress. i am grateful to our witnesses, whom i will introduce. before i do that, opening statements. >> i think the chairman for the rec
and a failure of leadership and america deserves better. >> it's true when bill clinton left office in 2000 we had you are plus and the deficit would have been eliminated as we sit here today what changed that was the republican president and congress. what put us on the path we are on now is not democrats. we would have no collective debt at all if we had left in place the clinton budgetary strategy. megyn: what do you make of that quote. >> what i'm responding to is i think what we are dealing with is a tell poar a temporal thing. it would drive the markets down and create say could and uncertainty. the president is saying we can't go through that again. megyn: he's wanting not only to raise it but to have uniform authority to raise. a fewer years ago they were saying that was a failure of leadership. >> he may not get it but he's right to argue that way the republicans have been doing this has been irresponsible. let's get this done in the way our democracy has worked the for hundreds of years. not this new extraordinary thing. i think he's right to put pressure on the republicans. megyn: i
president clinton was in office, he left this country in the black. the people have weighed in. they've indicated that we want to move forward, we want to put people to work but we want to do it in a fair method of doing it. and that is not cutting programs that impacts the working poor in this country. mr. garamendi: well, you're absolutely correct about that. the proposal to cut medicare benefits is a nonstarter. there are things that can be done in medicare to reduce the costs and much has already been done. i'd like to ask my colleague from the great state of michigan to join us, mr. curson is a new member, came in during a special election. welcome. delighted to have you join us. mr. curson: thank you. i agree wholeheartedly with what's been said so far and the testimony, what i really want to say -- into the mic. what i really want to say is medicare is run more efficiently than nearly any insurance company in the world. they devote less than 2% of its funding to administrative expenses, and you compare that to a private insurance company that costs up to 40% of premiums for in
clinton gets ready for a rare meeting with her russian counterpart on the crisis rocking syria. that could be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its position and support stronger u.n. action against syria. molly henneberg is live at the pentagon keeping an eye on all of these developments. why is russia so important here, molly. >> reporter: russia is one of syria's allies, in fact one of sear kwras onl syria as only allies. and that is why it is thought they may have some sway over syria and bashar al-assad. hillary clinton is in a meeting this afternoon at a security conference in dublin, ireland. they will be meeting today specifically on syria. at the same time the secretary general of the united nations says he also is pressing syria not to use chemical weapons. >> i'm just very much concerned, and i have warned that in any case if chemical weapons is used then they will have to be put to justice and create serious consequences to those people. >> reporter: if president bashar al-assad were to leave the country it would create an immediate problem with who would take over
in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is not a dirty word. >> the legendary "bloomberg view" columnist -- margaret carlson. >> i had this plan for a couple weeks -- i thought, this could happen. when you said you cannot get people in the corner as the president has with the tax increase on the wealthy -- here is the plan. on december 31, the bush tax cuts expire. after you have your champagne and you are funny hats on, on january 1 at 12:01 a.m., there is a middle-class tax cut and the top rate is 39.6%, then they are cut to 37%, so republicans get their tax cut. isn't
-- a return. it is similar to what the former clinton chief of staff -- separate from that commission, he testified before the super committee last year and put forward his own proposal to try to break the impasse at that time. republicans say their current offer is not in that proposal, so it is not the simpsons-bowles plan that has gotten a lot of talk over the last few years, but it is modeled on a proposal from a leading democrat during these discussions, so they are hoping it will give some credibility going forward. the $800 billion they are offering is not the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. -- is the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. they will not accept any deal that keeps tax rates the same as well. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> you can read his proposal online by going to c-span.org and clicking to the lake. oklahoma congressman tom cole discusses the fiscal cliff negotiations and agrees with suggestions they should join president obama to extend the tax rates for the highest income earners the law professor john buckley looks at the history of the tax, plu
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)